Farm inputs and materials

#Using approved materials

Understanding if a material — fertilizer, pest control, etc. — can be used in organic takes a few extra steps. Even when consulting the resources, always check that you are using the material for its reviewed purpose and following all the restrictions.

What materials do I need to use during my transition to organic?

For the transition leading up to organic certification, you can only use materials that are allowed in organic production. This includes fertilizers, pest and disease controls, seeds, seed treatments, livestock treatments, cleaning agents, and any other materials used on the farm. The USDA National List of Allowed and Prohibited Substances outlines what’s permitted (and what’s not) in organic.

How do I know if a material is ok to use on my farm?

In general, synthetic materials are not allowed for use in organic, unless they’re on the National List.

The Organic Materials Review Institute (OMRI) and the Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) offer the best searchable lists for approved-for-use materials. We’ve outlined the process for finding, adding and documenting materials to use on your farm. But we always recommend checking with us prior to using any questionable material during your transition process.

#Using fertilizers

Organic farmers are required to manage soil fertility and crop nutrients in a way that maintains or improves soil organic matter content.

Approved methods include, but are not limited to, crop rotations, cover crops, and the incorporation of plant and animal materials into soil. All fertilizers and soil amendments must be included in your Organic System Plan and approved by OTCO.

How do I know if I can use a fertilizer?

When asking, “Can I use this fertilizer or material?,” focus on the product’s composition. You must follow the same guidelines for materials, observing all approved product restrictions and prohibitions per the National List.

Do not risk jeopardizing your certification — a label may not disclose all of the product’s ingredients. For all non-OMRI or non-WSDA approved materials, request approval from your client service team. Never use an unapproved fertilizer until after OTCO review and receipt of approval.

What chemical fertilizers are prohibited?

All chemical fertilizers — particularly macronutrient nitrogen, phosphate (e.g., triple or super) or potash — as identified on the product composition label are prohibited for use.

Are ammonia and nitrate-based fertilizers prohibited?

All ammonia fertilizers and most nitrate fertilizers are not allowed.

Are soluble natural fertilizers allowed?

All highly soluble natural fertilizers are permitted for use with restrictions.

Is lime permitted for use?

Not all sources of lime are allowed. Mined limestone (calcium carbonate) and dolomite (magnesium carbonate) are permitted for use, while quicklime (calcium oxide), burnt dolomite (magnesium oxide), slaked lime (calcium hydroxide), and milk of magnesia (magnesium hydroxide) are prohibited.

What about fish-based or aquatic products?

Stabilized liquid fish products, aquatic plant extracts and humic acid derivatives are permitted for use with restrictions.

Are there any prohibitions for compost?

Compost made from sewage sludge (human waste/bio-solids) or fortified with synthetic fertilizers is prohibited. Additionally, you must follow compost restrictions and guidelines.

#Using micronutrients

If organic farm methods for nutrient management such as cover crops and application of compost can’t resolve soil deficiencies, micronutrients may be allowed for use.

When are synthetic micronutrients allowed for use?

Synthetic micronutrients are allowed only in cases of clearly document soil deficiency of a specific nutrient. We accept soil or plant tissue tests as documentation prior to approval for use. In addition, you must document the nutrient requirements for the crop.

As with all agricultural inputs, never risk your certification. For all non-OMRI or non-WSDA approved materials, request approval from your client service team. Never use an unapproved micronutrient until after OTCO review and receipt of approval.

#Using manure

In farm crop production, you can use raw animal manure to enrich soil fertility — i.e., fresh manure not added to a compost process — under specific conditions and restrictions.

What restrictions apply for using manure with crops not destined for human consumption?

There are no restrictions for using manure with crops not for humans.

What restrictions apply for using manure with crops for human consumption?

Manure must be applied at least 120 days before the harvest date if the crop is for human consumption and the edible part touches soil surfaces or particles.

What restrictions apply for using manure with crops for human consumption that do not touch soil surfaces?

Manure must be applied at least 90 days before the harvest date if the crop is for human consumption but the edible part does not touch soil surfaces or particles.

Is livestock grazing near crops for harvest allowed?

Livestock grazing is allowed on certified organic land and follows the same rules for raw manure. Animals must be removed either 90 or 120 days prior to harvest depending on if the edible part of the crop comes into contact with soil or not.

Are there special requirements, besides crop contact (or not) with soil when using off-farm sourced manure?

For off-farm manure, you will need a statement from the supplier for all ingredients — including any additives, bedding, inoculants, anti-caking/flow agents, etc. — to show it doesn’t contain prohibited materials per the National List.

#Using compost

In general, compost is only required to meet specific requirements if it has animal materials.

Are there any restrictions for making and using plant-based compost?

For compost without animal materials, be sure to prevent contamination by not using any plant waste that has been adversely treated or would spread contamination.

Are there any restrictions for making and using compost with animal materials?

When using compost with animal materials, you must observe the following requirements:

  • The initial ratio of Carbon (C) to Nitrogen (N) must be between 25C:1N and 40C:1N
  • When composting by in-vessel or using a static aerated pile system, compost temperature must be kept for three (3) days between 131 degrees Fahrenheit and 170 degrees Fahrenheit
  • When composting using a windrow system, compost temperature must be kept for 15 days between 131 degrees Fahrenheit and 170 degrees Fahrenheit and be turned over at least five (5) times
  • Keep clear, auditable records of your composting process including date/time, temperature, and turning information

Are there any restrictions for using off-farm sourced compost with animal materials?

The product must come with a statement of ingredients (feedstocks), times, temperatures and pile turnings to show it meets all the above requirements. For all non-OMRI or non-WSDA approved materials, request approval from your client service team. Never use an unapproved compost until after you’ve received from OTCO for the material review.

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